Game of the Month – October 2018

We check in on the league and get started for a brand new season of Game of the Month.

The league is in full swing!

Division One proving as tough as ever and a little surprising; Downend B are on top thanks to a youthful and in-form team. Bath A are lurking with a match in hand and look very strong, for example only losing 2.5 points to all 3 Horfield teams put together!

Conversely to division 1, the ‘A’ teams are in charge of the other three divisions: North Bristol, Cabot, and Harambee with a much improved start compared to last season in division 4 (they have a game in hand over Clevedon C, level on points).

Game of the Month

Rob Attar vs. Max Walker

Horfield B vs Clevedon A (division 1)

I was playing in this match, and would have shown my own loss on board 1, succumbing to some nice tactics from my opponent, but there was a sharper game on board 4 from Max:

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. Bf4 b6 4. e3 Nc6 5. Bd3 Be7 6. O-O Nb4

pos1
With Nb4, Max removes the ‘London Bishop’

7. c4 Nxd3 8. Qxd3 Bb7 9. Nbd2 O-O 10. e4 d5 11. cxd5 exd5 12. e5 Ne4 13. Rac1 c5 14. b3

pos2
Here Max goes for cramping the other bishop with g5!

14… g5 15. Bg3 g4 16. Ne1 cxd4 17. Qxd4 Bc5 18. Qd3 Ba6

pos3
Ba6! A nice tactical idea with the plan of Nxd2, trapping the rook on f1.

The engines prefer Qg5, which is always hanging in the air – but perhaps this is more a computer favourite because it shuts out a few perpetual possibilities for White. But if one thing is certain, Rob wasn’t looking for chances to bail out! With the g-pawn gone, this is still a very double-edged position.

Rob accepts the exchange loss and sets about creating counter-chances against the open king, but Max finds a cool defence:

19. Qxa6 Nxd2 20. Qe2 Nxf1 21. Qxg4+ Kh8 22. Kxf1 Rg8 23. Qf3 Qd7 24. Bh4 Be7

pos4
Be7(!) defends f6 but leaves a tempting Qxf7

And Rob takes the bait with Qxf7! This is a piece sacrifice, with the idea being that after Black escapes the pin with Qb5+ and then Bxh4, White has the nasty Rc7! Threatening h7 mate with no obvious escape.

But Max had seen one:

25. Qxf7 Qb5+ 26. Kg1 Bxh4 27. Rc7

pos5
Black has one defence to Qxf7…

27… Bxf2+! And Black either drags the king to an unfortunate square (If Kh1, Qf1 mate; and if Kxf2, Rf8 pins and wins) or distracts the White queen away from mate so that Black can bring in the reinforcements in time. Phew!

28. Qxf2 Raf8 29. Nf3 Qd3 30. Ne1 Rxf2 31. Nxd3 Rgxg2+ 32. Kh1 Rxh2+ 33.
Kg1 Rxa2 34. e6 Rhd2 35. Ne1 Rd1 36. Kf1 Raa1 37. Kf2 Rxe1 38. e7 Kg8
0-1 (Full game below)

Well played to Max and to Clevedon A who won that match and are definitely in the running for division 1. See you next time and remember to keep sending in those games!


 

mikecircle

Mike is co-editor of The Bristol Chess Times and plays regular league and tournament chess

Horfield win over ‘Rest of league’ in 75th anniversary celebration

Founded by air-raid wardens in 1942 and still going strong – strong enough to beat the rest of the league in their anniversary match!

Miraculously or not, two even-handed teams of 11 chess warriors rocked up for battle on Saturday morning, supplied with coffee, cake and biscuits and 45 minutes on the clock. It was Horfield’s 75th – playing against a mixed team representing 7 different league clubs. The captains were Bristol league legends John and John (Richards and Curtis), organised and arbitrated by yours truly.

round2
The top boards in round 2

A history of the club (also found on Horfield’s website) was on display, along with famous games past and present.

history
A long history

The pleasant and spacious playing hall was just upstairs from the usual dinky Horfield rooms – unfortunately reserved for Pilates on Tuesday evenings.

room
Plenty of mental gymnastics going on in the fitness room

Geoff Gammon got to play instead of arbitrate, and brought along a number of puzzles to add to the collection – one of the beauties is below:

puzzle.jpg
White to play and win (solution at the end of this article)

Though a friendly match, chess players are always up for a fight and Horfield will be rejoicing at the convincing scoreline, 15 – 7! Only two players won both their games – Derek Pugh and Phil Nendick of Horfield A.

result
Horfield won 7-4 with all players playing Black, and bettered that by 1 in round two with the White pieces to total 15-7

Memorabilia was also on display – including the charming ‘h-file’ leaflet/magazine:

hfile
Classic photos from yonderyear

Thanks to Horfield for putting on a friendly event for the league, and to all those who travelled to play and show support for a long-standing club.

In other news

I couldn’t stand to organise chess and not play for much longer, so I saddled on down to the Cross-Hands pub for some blitz on the Sunday night.

Through a combination of dubious sacrifices, grovelling for draws against people half my age, winning on time whilst literally getting checkmated and all-around time-scrappery, I managed to win a tournament outright for the first time in at least 5 years. So thanks to Downend, Derek and Elmira for organising and Geoff for arbitrating.

Come along next time on December 2nd (especially if you live in Downend – no excuse really!) Details will be on Downend’s website.

Puzzle Solution

After the ridiculous Kg5!! Black has a couple of waiting moves (c5 is met with d5!, and f4 is met with f3!) before fatal zugzwang, where the Black queen is lost with every move.


 

mikecircle

Mike is co-editor of the Bristol Chess Times, is now a feared blitz superstar across the land, and plays regular league and tournament chess

Chess events in Oct/Nov

Winter is threatening to unleash itself on Bristol, so we thought we’d remind you of some all-weather chess events before Christmas

Chipping Sodbury Rapidplay – Sunday 21st October

Everyone’s favourite Sodbury – the Bristol league will once again proudly host some rapid wood-pushers in this charming town. Lunchtime visits to the antique/craft/charity shops and several pubs are recommended/obligatory. Details here.

7_Major Dave

Horfield vs. The League – Saturday 3rd of November

Still spaces left for Bristol league players of any playing strength to enter this friendly anniversary match. There will be two medium-length games, as well as puzzles with a difference, free refreshments, some history of Horfield & Redland club and perhaps a speech from their humble chairman.

Crosshands Blitz – Sunday 4th of November

More blitz action organised by Downend’s Elmira Walker – see their site for details – we hope to make this one!

Screen Shot 2018-09-28 at 07.59.19
Remember places are limited on a first come first serve basis

…Nothing else happening in the chess world in November, right? 😉


mikecircle

Mike is co-editor of the Bristol Chess Times and plays regular league and tournament chess

Chess myths: Are there really 3 phases to a chess game?

Is it always this simple? Can you define a phase of a chess game? And does your perception of them change how you play?

Opening, Middlegame, and Endgame. This model is simple and may be a useful one to teach, and to define books and DVD’s (Master the Middlegame!, Improve your opening play, etc.). And I must admit I am a fan of chess quotes like these:

“Play the Opening like a book, the middlegame like a magician, and the endgame like a machine” – Rudolph Spielmann

or

“To beat me you have to do it three times – once in the opening, once in the middlegame, and once in the endgame” – World Champion Alekhine, at the height of his career.

However I also believe that seeing the game this way can alter your evaluations of your play and it can be limiting (“I’m really bad at endgames”) or (“That was lost from the opening”). It can be harmful to stop at these categorisations. You can get stuck in thinking only in terms of these three phases to the extent that it actually harms your moves. A few years ago I was stuck in thinking that a ‘lost’ endgame is irreparable – and I would prefer to make highly speculative moves in the middlegame rather than brave a slightly worse endgame. I didn’t appreciate that the endgame is long – and includes several phases.

To improve your game, we have previously advocated asking other players what type of player you are, and I realised something about my own play when someone said that I “win all my games in the middlegame”. I hadn’t realised, but he was right, I reached an endgame less often than other players.

Now, I’m of course still more than happy to win games in the middlegame – but when I am on the losing side I have learned to fight on and test out opponent’s endgame skills, rather than test their ability to refute a wild sacrifice. Through this, I have learned that a chess game is pretty long after all. The ‘endgame’ especially – can be exceedingly long both in moves played, and the amount of ‘play’ left. One example is this unfavourable position last season, which I managed to turn around:

position1
White is a pawn ahead – and has been since the opening. But Black has been avoiding easy piece-swaps, and therefore keeping the game alive.

I was forced to give up a pawn after a bad opening. Crucially though I had kept the game slightly alive and decided not to panic, and offer to go into double-edged middlegames and endgames. That doesn’t always mean keeping the queens on, it doesn’t always mean closing up the position – it just means finding some imbalance. Here I found myself in a double rook endgame where I could attempt to get my own passed pawn. It still wasn’t great, but it was enough to try.

I eventually conjured up a passed f-pawn which won me the game after a very natural move Rb8 was played here: (Full playback below)

position2a
White is winning, but the best is b5! to gain another passed pawn. My opponent played the natural Rb8, to which I immediately replied Rxa7! There followed Rxa7? and f2! winning for black. See the game below for the cheeky preparatory move Kg7…

My machine says that the game was about +3 to White from move 28 until the mistake on move 43. That’s 15 moves where Black is effectively down a whole piece. But in human terms, it was an extra pawn and some serious work to make it count.

Losing the psychological game

It can be the hardest thing to win a won game. And in amateur chess there are so many swings in the endgame (like the game above!) But take this as a positive – you can play for a win in a lot of positions, just stay positive and try to either prolong or complicate things until your opponent slips up. When you think you are losing, don’t stop looking for wins!

Have you ever been on the back foot in a game, and offered/accepted a draw only to realise that you were actually winning in the end position?

I think this has happened to many of us. If you reach an endgame and think “okay – I’m playing for a draw” then you may miss chances to steer thing around and transition to a winning ‘endgame proper’ – and instead of hanging on, you’ll see ways to complicate the position and create chances for your opponent to slip.

Transitions

In A + B, the ‘+’ is an important ingredient. Or something like that. The point is there is a moment between the Opening and Middlegame, or between the Middlegame and Endgame, which are called transitions. They may last a few moves, and there may be several of them in a row. Some examples include:

  • Exchanges – e.g. trading the queens to go into a ‘Berlin Endgame’ or trading minor pieces to ensure an ‘opposite-coloured bishops ending’
  • Pawn advances to change the structure – e.g. advancing a pawn to block up the centre – turning the game into a blocky, manoeuvring battle
  • Pawn advances to attack – typically the f or g pawns moving two squares with opponent’s castled kingside, signify so much about your plan (and because pawns can’t move backwards, you’re sort of stuck with it!)
  • Sacrifices – these change everything!

There are others of course, but transitions are often more than just one move, they may be preceded by preparatory moves or by other exchanges. They can be short phases – but incredibly important.

The Endgame proper

One phase that definitely deserves recognition is the ‘Endgame Proper’ – how many half points – or even full points – have you seen be lost or won with just a few pieces left? For example this one:

pawntrick
White to move – Kd6! wins, but the natural Kd5 actually loses to Kf4.

Or how about a rook and king vs bishop and king? Can you draw with the bishop? Can you mate with a bishop and knight? These are all ‘Endgame Proper’ examples and well-worth knowing!

The education of a chess player

I may be over-simplifying this, then again it may be a useful way to think about it, but I believe that the more phases you are able to distinguish in a chess game, the more chance you have to improve in all phases.

Let’s follow this through a typical learning curve:

New player – 1 phase

At the very beginning, you see 1 phase – just the game of chess; one long, incredibly complex and surprising string of moves that don’t seem to relate to each other that much. Total chaos in other words!

Beginner – 3 phases

Soon after learning a few things, you see 3 phases:

  • Opening
  • Middlegame
  • Endgame

This helps to break down that enormity and – for example – help you focus on learning the Guioco Piano, or queening an outside passed pawn in a king+pawn endgame.

Beyond – 5 or 6 phases

Later on you see more and more phases and start to think differently. For example, right now I am trying to see up to 6 phases:

  • Opening
  • Transition
  • Middlegame
  • Transition
  • Endgame
  • Endgame proper

Some people have suggested 7, with the addition of another Opening phase – but I’ll need to know more theory for that one! And some have suggested 5, in various combinations.

Of course at some point the distinctions become a less and less practical – like arguing how many dimensions or universes there might be. But even thinking about going beyond 3 can lay the groundwork for improvement.

And who knows what really happens in the minds of the Super-GMs – there may be many more definable phases, as well as the infinite parallel-universe games played out frantically on analysis boards. (If you are a super-GM reading this, by the way, please let us know what goes on!).

Conclusion

Chess is a game where it can all change in one move – let alone one phase – but the longer you see the game to be, and the longer you are willing to play it, the more ways you will see to win it.


 

mikecircle

Mike is co-editor of the Bristol Chess Times and plays regular league and tournament chess

Season preview and August news

We take a look forward to the season – starting tomorrow! – and a look back at our predictions last time around.

First off, a few tournament results:

Mike Meadows (Downend) won the Downend Summer Rapid tournament with a great last night to pull ahead of clubmate Oli Stubbs and David Painter-Kooiman – congratulations! A thorough – totally unbiased – report is on Downend’s site.

The Steve Boniface Memorial was missing GM Arkell, and the heavy favourite IM Alan Merry could not repeat his Spring victory – instead Graham Moore won it with a perfect 5/5! Tim Woodward took another victory in the major, and Jonathon Gould scooped the minor.

No joint winners this time in any section! Results available on chessit.co.uk, and an annotated game by Toby Kan here.

2018/19 season predictions

It’s scary to think its almost 2019 – so let’s have a quick review of our predictions from last year:

Division 1: Clifton A – WRONG (Actual winners: Horfield A – our ‘Dark Horses’ pick)

Division 2: South Bristol B – WRONG (Actual winners: Clevedon B)

Division 3: Yate A – WRONG (Actual winners: Keynsham – our ‘runners-up’ pick)

Division 4: Downend F – WRONG (Actual winners: North Bristol B – our ‘runners-up’ pick)

So, let’s try to beat that score shall we? Here are all the competitors:

tables
A fresh start – what surprises are in store this season?

Division 1

Champions: Horfield A

We are going for a successful defence of the title for Horfield (again, totally unbiased). They have lost star player Aaron Guthrie, but they remain strong and are hungry for more.

Dark Horses: Bath A

Bath are always knocking around the top of the table and it is tough to play them away – can they step up this year?

Division 2

Champions: Clevedon B

A great season last time around for the club and a strong junior presence – surely they’ll be ruffling a few feathers.

Dark Horses: North Bristol A

Can they consolidate their squad and put out a regular mean team? We think maybe!

Division 3

Champions: Cabot A

With Yate A and Keynsham A stepping up, division 3 is surely wide open – come on the Cabot!

Dark Horses: South Bristol B

The strength of the team is unknown as yet but South Bristol have always been able to produce strength in depth.

Division 4

Champions: Clevedon C

I’m running with the confidence theory with all those fresh trophies in the cabinet.

Dark Horses: Congresbury

Welcome back to the league! An unknown quantity this season so certainly worth a punt.

Well let’s see if I can do better than Jon with 8 predictions rather than 12. Right, season begins tomorrow – time for some preparation!


 

mikecircle

Mike is co-editor of BCT and plays regular league and tournament chess

Game of the Season 2017/18 – the winners!

It’s officially the start of a new season, so we better get the prizes for last year wrapped up.

Newsflash: BCT reaches 100 articles! Thanks to all contributors – we have had 13 authors from 7 different clubs, and lots of engagement from readers. What’s next for BCT? Well I’m sure we’ll write an article on it! Meanwhile its (digital) founder, Jon Fisher, welcomes his second son into the world earlier this very day – congrats buddy! Well, on with the chess and two other fine specimens to admire in wonder:

We gave you ten ‘Games of the Month‘ last season – you have picked your winner and so have we. Prizes will be awarded at a convenient time (i.e. when I next play against the winners’ club in a match), so without further ado…

GotS

People’s vote

The deluge of votes from the great chess public went for…

Aron Saunders! (Downend) – “Beware 3 Greeks bearing gifts”

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.O-O Nf6 5.d3 Ng4 6.h3 Nxf2

This is a common tempt in the opening – a bishop and knight for a rook and a pawn. As Aron ruthlessly demonstrates, the extra minor pieces can be immediately useful whereas the extra rook takes a while to get going, so this trade is often not advised for the offender.

7.Rxf2 Bxf2+ 8.Kxf2 O-O 9.Nc3 d6 10.Bg5 Qd7 11.Nd5 h6 12.Bf6

Bf6!! This is the first of 3 minor piece ‘offerings’ which earns this game its name. The first one can’t be taken because of the knight fork.

12..Na5 13.Qd2 Nxc4 14.dxc4 c6 15.Ne7+ Kh7 16.Nf5 g5 17.Nxg5+

Nxg5+! can’t be taken because of the impending queen invasion.

17..Kg6 18.Nh7

Nh7! An accurate finish. The knight gets out the way for the queen and doesn’t mind sacrificing itself, but elegantly defends the f6 bishop in the process.

18..Qxf5+ 19.exf5+ Kxh7 20.Be7 Rg8 21.f6 Rg5 22.Qxd6 Be6 23.b3 h5 24.Re1 Rf5+ 25.Kg1 Rg8 26.Rxe5 Rfg5 27.Rxg5 Rxg5 28.Qd3+ Bf5 29.Qd2 Rg6 30.Kh2 Be4 31.Qe2 Bxg2 32.Qxh5+ Kg8 33.Qxg6+ fxg6 34.Kxg2 1-0

The queen was given up in the hope of defence but it was all over – replay below. Nice one, Aron!

Editors pick

We agonised long and hard over a few different games; it was a close call but we went for an original game where both sides played with plenty of adventure and spirit. And the winner is…

Ethan Luc! (University) – “I’d rather be Luc(ky) than good”

Comments are from both Ethan (EL) and us (BCT):

Well done Ethan and great stuff everyone!

More games this season please!

This season (18-19) we are hoping for more games to showcase not just for Game of the Month but as educational articles like this one on the Hippo. So don’t be shy! Games will not be analysed to within an inch of their lives – just enjoyed by chess-lovers alike. Here are some ideas:

  • Send in other people’s games – (there are no rights issues here!)
  • Send fragments of games (e.g. just an endgame is fine!)
  • Send games from tournaments (often longer time-controls make for better games)
  • Send in puzzle-like variations of games
  • If you’re that way inclined – send in computer analysis (maybe you played a ‘perfect’ middlegame?)

We’ll do our best to publish all games and will be continuing Game of the Month – so always appreciate more fodder.

Have a great season everyone!


 

mikecircle

Mike is co-editor of the Bristol Chess Times and plays regular league and tournament chess, sometimes underwater.

The Preview – Steve Boniface Memorial

We take a quick look back at the spring congress to see what’s in store this weekend – and an update on my training for the diving chess world champs.

The last bit of tournament chess before the season begins! Bristol will once again battle for five intense rounds in three sections – in honour of legendary arbiter Steve Boniface.

It’s yet to be confirmed whether regular GM Keith Arkell will return to seek revenge on IM Alan Merry for the final round defeat in the Spring – the 26-move French is shown below. Alan won the tournament along with FM Mike Waddington. The top of the player lists for all three sections is shown below – watch out for the return of the irrepressible Frank Palm, now resident in Germany.

entrants

Here is the miniature from Alan (or is a miniature less than 25 moves? I forget, but its a nice handling of the French defence anyway).

All three sections are packed with past champions so it should be a bloody weekend! Sadly neither of your editors will be playing. Jon is currently nursing multiple injuries (not chess-sustained) and expecting a second child imminently, whilst I am (perhaps more importantly) playing in the world championships of diving chess. If you don’t know what that is, watch this video on YouTube. But it’s basically chess – underwater. The clock is your ability to keep breathing.

Here is me on a recent intensive training camp in Tuscany:

chess1

Wish me luck, won’t you?


mikecircle

Mike is co-editor of the Bristol Chess Times and plays regular league and tournament chess

 

 

 

 

 

Game of the Season 2017-18! Votes please…

All 10 Games of the Month from last season in Bristol&Bath. Please submit votes for your favourite! We have made our choice just in case, but there is a people’s vote as well as an editor’s pick, so get choosing! Comments, emails, and Facebook votes all welcome.

This season was the first full one for the Bristol Chess Times – one of our initiatives was a ‘Game of the Month’ (GotM). This relied on submissions from players, or captains, but also on us to look around at tournaments or on other websites where games are published. This is a known bias – one month we were so starved of games that we had to go with one of mine – but hopefully this will only spur on more game suggestions for next year!

GotS

*Rest assured as co-editor my effort in October is exempt from winning Game of the Season (GotS) but let’s have a recap of the 10 ‘Games of the month’ and we’ll let you decide the rest:

September

Remember September? Perhaps this swift ‘Greek Gift’ win from Aron will jog your memory:

October

This lively game was a crucial part of Horfield B’s surprise win over Downend A early in the season:

November

Perhaps this all-out war between Lewis and Oliver, who clearly agreed to a ‘no castling’ rule before the game, will get your pick:

(December had no GotM)

January

We went with a bumper edition in January, to pull out 4 defensive/counterattacking  wins with Black. First up was Rich Wiltshir’s cool defence to claim joint first in the Clevedon Congress major:

Next was tournament organiser Graham Mill-Wilson showing disregard for a knight settling next to his king for most of the game and getting the job done to win the minor section:

League newcomer Waleed Khan played a classical game here from a Sicilian position, developing and centralising until a deadly pin was enough to force resignation:

And finally for January, a deadly and accurate finish emerging from another seemingly normal Sicilian by Steve Woolgar:

February

Devon didn’t know what hit it when Thornbury’s Lynda Smith won the day with a smooth and controlled attack:

March

Back to the league and the ever-enterprising Mike Meadows was elegantly unhinged here by university’s Ethan Luc:

(April had no GotM)

May

Finally, Jerry Hendy was under some pressure in this league game but gives up three pawns for a resignation:

Phew! 10 is a lot of chess games. But we have picked a winner! We’ll announce both the ‘people’s vote’ and the ‘editor’s pick’ soon.

One thing I notice is that all of these games are wins. A draw can often be an epic struggle and worthy of any prize, so maybe next season we’ll have of few more of those.

 


 

mikecircle

Mike is co-editor of the Bristol Chess Times and plays regular league and tournament chess

Two Latvian Gambit games from the Bristol Open 2018

Avid readers will recall that on June 15th I gave this advice for a must-win tournament situation against 1.e4: Play the Latvian Gambit – “…2.f5… Bd6, sack a rook and win the tournament in a blaze of glory”. That very night the Bristol Spring Congress commenced and as if I had scripted it – a player called Mike played the Latvian twice, won twice, and (jointly) won the tournament in a blaze of glory.

Unfortunately for me it was FM Mike Waddington – who in a cruel twist of fate also beat me with White after I played an ambitious f5, miscalculating after arriving 27 minutes late. But that’s another story.

Mike appears to also have a soft spot for the Latvian Gambit (and a better understanding of it). Here are his two wins which helped him on the way to 4.5/5 in a very competitive open field:

Gambit accepted: the exf5 line

“The best way to refute a gambit is to accept it”. After 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f5 White can play 3.exf5 – and the game is on.

latvian1

Mike appears to have read my advice (scroll to 3. exf5) and goes for e4, Qe7, Nc6 and rapid bishop development:

After Nxc6 dxc6, d3 and Bxf5 Black has some control and is not any material down – the engine gives it -0.44 (small advantage for Black). After a few more moves (play through the game below) the queens come off and Black is fine with the pieces on good squares and White’s d-pawn isolated.

The middlegame was not a typical Latvian tactics fest – but Mike eventually wins the endgame after a favourable exchange of the last piece.

Main Line

Mike got a second chance to play the Latvian and got the main line where the queen enjoys an early outing to g6: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f5 3.Nxe5 Qf6 4.d4 d6 5.Nc4 fxe4 6.Nc3 Qg6

The engine gives it around +1 here, but as I discuss in the original article it is often officially good for White but actually difficult to play. For example in our game here, it becomes a dangerous prospect for White to castle on either side of the board.

Mike manages to get in d5 and gets the classic Latvian bishop to d6 after: 7.Ne3 c6 8.Bc4 d5 9.Bb3 Nf6 10.Ne2 Bd6. Looks comfortable enough:

And it gets uncomfortable for White after some pretty natural moves – f4 was played here to try to avoid the oncoming assault on the king:

After f4 we have Bg4 and the pressure switches to the centre and White’s queen is quickly needing some space. Lewis gives up the exchange instead but there is no real compensation. Mike ends up three pawns up after giving back the exchange to get a comfortable ending:

Well done to Mike who also won against 4th seed Graham Moore (and against me, but that’s less impressive), to tie 1st place with IM Alan Merry.

We hope to see some more Latvians played at the top level soon!

…And in fairness to Mike’s other victims, here is my game:


mikecircle

Mike is co-editor of the Bristol Chess Times and plays regular Bristol chess

GT Rapidplay report and Bristol tournament news

One of the hottest days of the year and a massive cycling event blocking a lot of roads in the centre of Bristol wasn’t the best day for chess – but the hardiest fans still arrived ready for a different kind of heat over the board (and the actual heat).

If you’re ever having a bad day, then my performance in this tournament may cheer you up. Casually late for round 1 I was lucky to get a half-point bye, then an undeserved win with White in round 2 gave way to four straight losses. From the benign to the blunderous and then the classic ‘forget your own surprise opening and burn a rook’.

But there was also some good chess happening – first of all in the Open there were many Cliftonites (Cliftonians?) setting the pace but one newcomer Antony Stannard from North Bristol managed to work his way through the pack to get to board 1 for the final round – a win over IM James Cobb would steal the title. Sadly no heroic tale this time, as James calmly took the title ahead of the other IM Cobb (Charlie, looking on from board two in the final round).

open
Anthony a pawn down in an ending – close but no cigar

In the major it was a cleaner sweep for North Bristol with Graham Iwi pipping Gareth Cullen to the post. Here is Graham surviving some pressure from Steve:

major
I assume that the next move was Rd8+, forcing the rook trade and then retreating the queen to cover the c3 pawn.

More North Bristol success came in the form of Waleed Khan who came third and also took the grading prize. We bring you one of his games against the top seed in the major. After some solid opening play, Gareth is on the attack – but Waleed finds the shuffling manoeuvre of Kh8, then back to g8, and Kh8 again to dodge the various attacking ideas – and he ends up a rook ahead with no danger left:

Well done to Clifton (particularly Igor and Dave) for organising, Geoff for arbitrating, and for North Bristol for a resounding success!

As for me I’ll hit the books.

News about upcoming tournaments

South Bristol Rapidplay (message from Roy Day):

To all our past entrants, friends and anyone that intended playing in the annual South Bristol chess clubs open tournament this year; I have been organising this tournament now for several years and thought I would give it a rest this year.
I apologise to all who may have intended playing but maybe this year with the present hot climate it may be for the best and we do not have air conditioning
All the best to all chess players

Downend Summer Tournament:

If you’re up for something a bit different then this may be up your street – a well-structured innovation from Downend to fit around busy summer calendars. Four nights of blitz chess but only your best three results count towards the total. So if you missed round 1, not to worry! The next round, conveniently after all the football and tennis excitement, is the 17th of July at Downend. You also play opponents with White and Black, so you can claim immediate revenge for that cheeky swindle…

Bristol Summer Congress:

Same place, similar huge field (probably) and cooler weather (probably) on the 24th-26th August.


 

mikecircle

Mike is co-editor of the Bristol Chess Times and plays regular league and tournament chess in Bristol